How Oxford University Press is engaging with contemporary educational research through the ‘Oxford Impact’ initiative

The Oxford Impact (OI) initiative is Oxford University Press’ (OUP) response to the demand for evidence. OI has helped OUP move towards building a decision-making tool used for rigorous evaluations of OUP’s educational resources, services and materials: The Oxford Impact Framework. Read about OUP’s perspective on their role in providing evidence on the impact of the materials OUP publishes. Continue reading How Oxford University Press is engaging with contemporary educational research through the ‘Oxford Impact’ initiative

Illustrates the flow that PLNs work through. Processes that go into PLNs are on the left and the benefits/outcomes are on the right.

Maximising the benefits of Professional Learning Networks: finding ways to achieve research-informed practice at scale

Maximising the benefits of Professional Learning Networks: finding ways to achieve research-informed practice at scale
Professor Chris Brown, Jane Flood, and Stephen MacGregor write about Professional Learning Networks and examine how to maximize the impact of PLNs so that all teachers and students benefit. This blog focuses on the role Distributed Leadership has. Continue reading Maximising the benefits of Professional Learning Networks: finding ways to achieve research-informed practice at scale

Tracking Education Practice to Research

Rationale for Studying Brokerage To realize the potential for education research to improve teaching and learning we need to better understand the relationship that currently exists between two communities: researchers and school-based educators. For educators and researchers relationships are often indirect, with knowledge and information shared through organizations or individuals referred to as brokers. TheContinue reading Tracking Education Practice to Research

Common Guidelines for Education Research and Development

Common Guidelines for Education Research and Development
This article describes NSF and ED’s shared understanding of the roles of various types of research in generating evidence about strategies and interventions for increasing student learning. The primary audiences for this paper are agency personnel, scientific investigators who seek funding from these agencies, and those who service as peer reviewers. Continue reading Common Guidelines for Education Research and Development